Tragedy for Books Around the World

The Independent reports on a devastating fire in Moscow at the INION (Academic Institute of Scientific Information on Social Sciences). The fire is contained, but caused severe damage to the building housing the 14.2-million volume collection.

Screen Shot 2015-01-31 at 1.49.17 PM                                                                                   *image retrieved from http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/huge-library-containing-historic-texts-and-14-million-books-goes-up-in-flames-moscow-10015455.html

Fire also destroyed books in Mosul. Books from the city’s Central Library have been carted away in trucks to a fiery death; and a University of Mosul library book bonfire at the hands of the Islamic State does not bode well for recorded history in Iraq these days. Ctvnews.ca reports.

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If Your Books Are Falling Apart at the Seams

Do you have books that need some TLC? And maybe you were impressed by BookIdeas’ post from November 18, 2014, A Bookbinder Near You, but don’t have one near you? Or, perhaps you consider yourself pretty handy or crafty, or both, and think you could do those much-needed book repairs yourself, if only you had some instruction? Well. Look no further, because today’s post is for you!

Book Repair Instructions has step-by-step guides for repairs on everything you can think of, including end papers, signatures, cleaning and repairing pages, spine repairs and more. Make sure to read the Glossary of Book Repair Terms first, though, to make sure you and the site’s author are talking about the same things. Book Repair Basics is also a vital early step, because there, the author touches on some very relevant points such as, Is my book worth repairing?, Book repair tools, How to make clam shell boxes, and other fundamentals of book repair.

Good luck! May all your broken spines be mended, and all your corners be made strong again.

More Book Headlines: Graphic History, YA Controversy, and 15 Signs of Book Addiction.

It’s as if they were reading my blog yesterday! (I wish..) The Independent reports on a new history of U.S. civil rights, as told in the style of a graphic novel. Read all about it and its 1950s comic book inspiration in A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form.

The Ottawa Citizen is reporting on the backlash received by a Governor General Literary Award-winning book for young adults. Read, Critics of ‘vulgar’ book for young adults want Governor General’s award rescinded to find out why there’s a petition to the Canada Council to have the 2014 award rescinded.

Lastly, you may be addicted to books. That’s not a bad thing, though! The Guardian shares 15 tell-tale signs to watch for if you’re still not sure this is you: 15 signs to prove you’re a book addict

Graphic Novels?

In my December 18, 2014 posting, Intriguing!, I got to thinking about graphic novels a bit. I realized that I don’t own any, and if I want to build a well-rounded collection, I should have some in it. The problem for me is, most graphic novels are dark, both literally and figuratively. The subject matter is often less than uplifting, and the images are frequently very graphic. Go figure. So I decided that I would make it my mission to find at least one graphic novel that I like: one with pleasing illustrations, and an uplifting or at least interesting story line. And guess what? I found some.

Shaun Tan’s book, The Arrival (2007) is stunning. The illustrations reminded me right away of Chris Van Allsburg’s style, and the creativity displayed as Tan marries the age-old tale of a newcomer in a foreign land with futuristic cityscapes and animals provided a new delight on every page. At 128 pages, it’s really more of an illustrated story (there are no words), than a graphic novel, but it’s still a worthy addition to anyone’s collection and will be enjoyed by adults and children alike. For more information, check it out on Amazon.com.
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Here, by Richard McGuire (2014), is also a really neat book. As I mentioned in December, it is the story of one little piece of land  told over many centuries, with glimpses into different years together on the same page. This is definitely a novel, at 304 pages, and also worth adding to your collection. For more information, check it out on Amazon.com.
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Interesting tidbits to start your day: Ladybird Books and James Patterson

The books we have seen since our youth featuring adorable illustrations of carefree childhood are an eye-opening glimpse into the health and safety regulations of the past. Or, should I say, the lack of health and safety regulations of the past. The Telegraph’s article, Ladybird books from the 1960s that would be banned by today’s health and safety brigade examines four books in the Junior Science Series that were released between 1962 and 1964, showing all sorts of scenarios that would give any of today’s mothers heart palpitations.

James Patterson is making headlines again with promises of one lucky person getting his newest book, but having only 24 hours to read it – before it explodes. Read The Independent’s, James Patterson, world’s wealthiest author, charges $300,000 for ‘exploding book’ for more on that unusual gimmick.

WWW Wednesdays

Well, here it is, Wednesday already. A couple of weeks ago, I tried participating in Should Be Reading‘s WWW Wednesdays event, and it was kind of fun. I missed last Wednesday, but I thought I might try it again today. The rules are, you share (1) What you are currently reading, (2) What you recently finished reading, and (3) What you plan to read next.

(1) I’m currently reading, The English Girl by Daniel Silva (2013). A spy thriller, and good so far, but I’ve barely started it.

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(2) I recently finished reading The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin (2014). It was heart-warming, but also sad. A keeper, though. I love books about bookstores.

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(3) Next I think I will read The Return of Captain John Emmett by Elizabeth Speller (2011). Set in post WW1 England, it’s also a thriller, and it was a Christmas gift from my father (thanks, Dad!).

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That’s it for this week’s WWW Wednesday installment. Feel free to comment with your own WWW Wednesday titles, or put a link to your WWW Wednesday post in the comments, or go straight to the source and comment at Should be Reading.

Don’t Miss Out – The 2015 OLA Super Conference is just around the corner!

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In case you haven’t already heard, OLA Super Conference 2015 kicks off next week, with the first sessions beginning at 9AM on Wednesday, January 28.

Check the schedule for all the fantastic sessions happening all day Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, and from 9:15-3 on Saturday.

Click here for a list of the keynote speakers, and click here for information on the Expo. Follow OLASC 2015 on Twitter at #OLASC2015. See you there!

*image retrieved from http://www.olasuperconference.ca

News: ‘Netflix for Books,’ Choose Your Books With Care, and Interactive Children’s Classics

There is a lot of news relating to books out there right now! That’s something that always makes me happy. Here are some articles for you to peruse:

Publishers Are Lining Up Behind ‘Netflix for Books’ Services. But Why? on Wired.com is about two startup companies that have partnered with Macmillan, and who were already working with HarperCollins and Simon & Schuster. The question this article poses is, why do publishers agree to partnerships with bottom lines amounting to “an always-accessible lending library with an infinite number of copies?”

I found, Three thousand reasons to choose your reading carefully a very thought-provoking piece that really confirmed my feeling that a book I’m not enjoying isn’t worth my time. But what if it’s a classic? Or, what if a special person loved it, and thinks you will too? These days, with life being so hectic, is reading a book that you aren’t enjoying at all, really worth finishing?

Ann Arbor startup MagicBook aims to bring classic children’s books to life at mlive.com is an article about something that people like me have a tough time with. Part of me loves the idea of an interactive, almost living, version of children’s classic stories. It’s wonderful to see those old characters come to life. But… isn’t the point of books a means for children to develop an attention span? Interactive eBooks like this article talks about, make me think of the interactive Alice in Wonderland that came out a few years ago. It’s neat, it’s fun, but again…is it really necessary? It is counterproductive?

7 Tricks for Better Reading; 8 Agatha Christie Tidbits

Huffington Post’s article, 7 Reading Hacks To Improve Your Literary Skills has some very interesting things to say. And a few of them were sort of surprising, like tip #1: Don’t Read in Bed. I thought that was one of the better places to read, so I guess I need to add another item to my list of new year’s resolutions!

CBC.ca has published a few little-known facts about Agatha Christie in, Agatha Christie: 8 interesting factsIt’s not a long piece, but I enjoyed learning more about one of my favorite authors.