France; eBooks

Not surprisingly, books are back in the news with an article about Michel Houellebecq’s new book, Soumission (Submission)Michel Houellebecq stops promotion of new novel after Charlie Hebdo attack goes into some detail about the book in light of the attack in Paris on January 7, along with the author’s reaction to those events. It ends with a promise that the book will be out in English in September.

Time.com has just released an encouraging (to some) article about the fall of eBook popularity in E-books Go Out of Fashion As Book Sales ReviveThe article reports results from UK book stores, so let’s hope that trend spreads back across the pond, too!

WWW Wednesdays

Should Be Reading hosts a weekly event called WWW Wednesdays (or at least it was hosted through 2014. I hope it’s still a thing..) where you share (1) What you’re currently reading, (2) What you recently finished reading, and (3) What you think you’ll read next. This is the first time I’ve contributed to a WWW Wednesday, but since there are a few minutes of Wednesday left, I thought I’d try it out and see how it feels.

(1) I’m currently reading Native Son by Richard Wright, first published in 1940.

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(2) I just finished reading The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt (2013);

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(3) and next I plan to read The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin (2014).

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(3)(i) Or maybe The English Girl by Daniel Silva (2013). I’m not sure yet.

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So there you have it: my first WWW Wednesday installment. Feel free to comment with your own WWW Wednesday titles, or put a link to your WWW post in the comments, or go straight to the source and comment at Should be Reading.

Healthy Book tips: How to safely handle and store your books

How to Handle Your Books

If you reach for your books by placing your fingers on the top of the spine and pulling them toward you off the shelf, you are not alone. Most people pull books off a bookshelf by tilting or sliding the volume towards them using the most obvious place to get a grip – the headcap, or row of stitching at the top of the spine. Pulling on the headcap, however, will eventually cause damage to the book.

photo 1   *This is the incorrect way to pull a book off a shelf.

Instead, press down on the top of the page block and gently tilt the book out until you can safely grasp it on either side with your thumb and fingers. Another option is to push back the books on either side of the desired volume so as to leave a space for you to grasp the book on either side with your thumb and fingers.

photo 2   *This is the correct way to pull a book off a shelf.

Storing Your Books

If you have a large book that can’t fit upright on your shelf, the best way to store it is lying flat. If space just doesn’t allow for that, store the book spine down. If you store your book spine up, the text block (all the pages) call fall out of the binding.

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*image retrieved from Northeast Document Conservation Center https://www.nedcc.org/free-resources/preservation-leaflets/4.-storage-and-handling/4.1-storage-methods-and-handling-practices

If you have a book that is fragile and needs support, the best thing to do is create a box made of archival-grade material that fits the book exactly and gives it the support it needs. The Northeast Document Conservation Center has a pamphlet on how to construct a protective book boxes, but if you don’t feel up to the task, contact a book binder or conservation centre near you to enlist expert help.