Print is Putting Up a Good Fight

Even though I have a degree in library science and am well-versed in the changes that libraries are experiencing as they transition more and more of their resources from print to digital, in my heart of hearts, I remain devoted to print.

So with my bias strongly in tact, I wanted to find some sources that back me up; some stats that show I’m not alone.

  1. Released on February 27, 2015 by Huffingtonpost.comSorry eBooks. These 9 Studies Show Why Print Is Better. Wonderful title aside, this article has interesting points relating to emotional connection, the belief that all good info is NOT online, and more.
  2. On March 26, 2015, digitalbookworld.com released New Survey Finds Millennial Readers Clinging to PrintSome interesting book stats on the 18 – 34 age bracket.
  3. Comics Should Be Good blog, hosted on comicbookresources.com, released She Has No Head! – Print vs. Digital on April 20, 2015. The author flat-out states that she prefers print (kudos to you, my friend!), and there are some interesting comments and feedback that present arguments both for and against comics in digital format.
  4. From npr.org on May 28, 2015 comes Technology of Books Has Changed, But Bookstores are Hanging In There. The article is a heart-warming exploration of an independent bookstore in Washington, D.C., Capitol Hill Books. A few words from a customer and other professionals add to the print versus digital books debate.

At the end of 2014 and into the beginning of 2015, there was much talk of the resurgence of print, and speculation about eBook sales slowing. Now that we are well into 2015, I am interested to see what end-of-year stats for this year will show!

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Are Your Books in Good Hands?

As we all know, books have been around for centuries, and many have survived to prove that fact. Tragically, most books printed today (mass market, trade publications) are predicted to last a mere 60 years. Why? Because of the mush they’re made of that breaks down quickly and is very acidic – unlike the rag paper that was used in the 15th century that still survives today.
IMG_1440  abtre14
*second image retrieved from http://www.collaborations.com/Ebay/abtre.htm

So while caring for your books may seem pointless if your collection is largely composed of recently published popular books, every little effort helps in making sure they last as long as possible. If you’re a regular follower of this blog (thank you!!) you will have seen various posts in the Healthy Books category here, but today I thought I would point the way to others who have also published quick tips on what to do (and what NOT to do!) to keep your books healthy.

  1. Care For Your Collectible Books: 18 Essential Tips by emptymirrorbooks.com
  2. How To Care For Your Books: 5 Tips by apartmenttherapy.com
  3. Dos and Don’ts for Taking Care of Your Personal Books at Home by the New York Public Library
  4. How To Care For Your Books by the Washington Post

The Best Positions for Reading, and How to Know if You Should Lend

As you can see from my Twitter feed, I just found a delightful post by the Times of India that prescribes the best way to position yourself for the utmost enjoyment of your book. 5 Postures to Read Books Perfectly sums it up quite nicely with information about leg height, foot support and more. For the best reading experience possible, check it out:
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This infographic will help take the agony out of that eternal question, “Should I lend them the book?” We have all wanted to lend someone a book at some point. We really want to share the insight that we gleaned from a certain book, and there are many factors that go into the decision to part with a book. What if they fold pages or damage the spine? Or, worse, what if we never get the book back? But they are such a good friend, and this book would really help them.. And so it goes. BUT, the infographic I found yesterday is a real help and I hope that the scenarios contained within it will help all of you in your future book-lending decisions. From BuzzFeed Books comes the wonderfully insightful, helpful infographic, “Should You Give Someone A Book?” created by Jon Adams.

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