It’s #ThrowbackThursday

This is my first #throwbackthursday post! I thought it might be fun to share this old photo of yours truly, because we are all book lovers here, and there’s a beauty of a card catalogue featured tucked into this picture.

Belleville, ON Public Library, 1985

I spent a week visiting my grandparents in Belleville one summer, and they took me to the library! What a time capsule this picture is.. Note what appear to be homemade dolls/stuffed animals behind me 🙂 But what I especially love is that beautiful card catalogue. Little did anyone know how soon it would become obsolete!

Thanks for visiting, and happy #throwbackthursday 💗

Carnegie Libraries: Amherstburg

Picturesque Amherstburg sits along the Detroit river in Southwestern Ontario, just south of Windsor in Essex county. Replete with historic buildings, this quaint little town is a history-lover’s dream, with buildings from the War of 1812, and ties to rum running and the Underground Railroad.

Essex County Library – Amherstburg branch

The Essex County Library branch in Amherstburg is another public library that was funded by Andrew Carnegie. He provided $10,000 in 1911, and the library opened to the public in 1913. In 1987 the building was granted Heritage Designation, and it’s no wonder: the building is made from limestone quarried in the former township of nearby Anderdon, and features many characteristics that are typical of Carnegie libraries. This is another rare example of a library built just after the turn of the last century that has maintained continual, uninterrupted service as a library!

Town of Amherstburg historic plaque for their public library funded by Andrew Carnegie

This beautiful structure was built on the site of a hotel that burned down in 1895. At that time, the town’s library was housed on Dalhousie street, and in 1901, it was moved to a building on Ramsay street before finally settling into the newly constructed location in 1913, where it remains to this day.

Detail of the imposing archway over the main entrance

According to a brief history of the library, as described by the Ontario Heritage Foundation, there was much back-and-forthing between Mr. Carnegie and the Amherstburg Town Clerk before the grant was agreed to. The architects who built the library submitted plans with design elements that Carnegie has previously approved, incorporating “Carnegie Stairs” and a “Carnegie Basement,” which are found in many other of his public libraries.

When the Amherstburg library moved into its new home on Sandwich street in 1913, it had just 6,000 volumes. But, by 1935, “Ontario Library Inspector F. C. Jennings stated in his report that the Amherstburg Library was one of the most complete and up to date in the County.” (https://www.heritagetrust.on.ca/en/oha/details/file?id=420, page 6)

This concludes our second library travelogue. Thank you for traveling with me to Amherstburg! Look for the next Carnegie Libraries installment on BookNotes soon. 💜

Sources:
http://www.mtc.gov.on.ca/en/libraries/carnegie.shtml
https://essexcounty.maps.arcgis.com/apps/MapJournal/index.html?appid=386befd577814c4f86e041837af7fab5
https://www.heritagetrust.on.ca/en/oha/details/file?id=420
https://windsorstar.com/news/local-news/amherstburg-to-mark-librarys-history/wcm/2a7652cf-80ce-4f27-936f-7a8015bd6e9d/
https://www.amherstburg.ca/en/live-and-play/heritage-designations.aspx
https://www.werelate.org/wiki/Place:Anderdon,_Essex,_Ontario,_Canada

What to read when you can’t concentrate

Have you noticed that it’s harder to stay focused these days? I think the stress of self-isolation, working remotely while still attending to your home and domestic responsibilities, and so much time together with the same people is getting to us. It’s safe to say that these are very unusual times, even though states, provinces, and countries are trying to slowly return to normal. It has been an unprecedented, stressful time for everyone.

What if you don’t feel like sitting in front of the TV for another day? But the thought of picking up a book is just too much; it feels overwhelming. Here are a few suggestions that might help.

1. Read some comics.

Calvin & Hobbes comics are always good for a laugh, and they brighten the spirits.

2. Pick up a graphic novel. The stories are just as complex as a regular novel, but with far fewer words (sometimes no words at all!), so they won’t overwhelm.

If you haven’t read a graphic novel before, now is the time to try one! Lots of words, no words, short or long, there’s a graphic novel out there just for you.

3. Why not bust out those old coloured pencils and give adult colouring a try? It might just be the de-stressor you never knew you needed.

Click on the image to buy this book on Amazon. Image courtesy of Amazon.com

I hope you find these ideas helpful. It’s true we are living in strange times, but good can come from this disruption of our busy routines: more (quality?) time with family, more time outside getting healthy fresh air, and maybe a broadening of your bookish horizons.

Until next time, happy reading! 💜

Carnegie Libraries: Paris

Brant Public Library – Paris branch

Andrew Carnegie is famous for his philanthropic donations in support of public libraries, and in fact, his donations resulted in 125 public libraries being built in Canada, 111 of which were in Ontario. Not all of the libraries remain in use today, but the one in Paris, Ontario still does.

Interesting tidbit: unlike many public libraries that were built near the turn of the last century, the Paris public library has been in continual use as such since it was built. A list of head librarians through the years can be found at the County of Brant Public Library Digital Collections website, along with the building’s timeline.

Paris Public Library first opened to the public on July 27, 1904.

Voted ‘the Prettiest Little Town in Canada’ by Harrowsmith Magazine, Paris is replete with natural beauty (it lies between two rivers) and architectural delights, featuring a great many well-kept Victorian buildings.

Fun fact: both Alexandrea Graham Bell and Andrew Carnegie have ties to this little town. On August 10, 1876, Alexander Graham Bell received the world’s first successful long-distance telephone call here; and as we know, Andrew Carnegie sponsored our featured library, tying both of these great men to the humble town of Paris, Ontario.

Doric columns are featured on the library’s former facade.

I hope you enjoyed this tiny library travelogue. There are several Carnegie libraries that I plan to feature in this new section of BookNotes, so please stay tuned for the next one!

Sources:
http://www.mtc.gov.on.ca/en/libraries/carnegie.shtml
http://images.ourontario.ca/brant/3281106/data?dis=dm
http://images.ourontario.ca/brant/2713035/data
https://oaa.on.ca/bloaag-detail/Carnegie-Libraries/327
https://www.brant.ca/en/live-and-discover/paris.aspx#