Biblio Body Art

I like books, obviously. I would even say without reserve that I love them. And there are a lot of people out there who share my enthusiasm, based on the number of Instagram profiles I’ve seen where people unabashedly proclaim their love for the codex. However, I think I can safely say that I will never love a book so much that I feel the need to put it in my skin. It turns out that I might be in the minority on that one, because there are a lot of pictures of book-related tattoos out there.

Let me say that even though I’m not a tattoo person, I do enjoy looking at interesting body art, and what could be more interesting than art about books?

44 Adorable Tattoo Designs for Book Lovers by Sortra.com :
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36 Stunning Book Tattoos That Are Surprisingly Badass at Buzzed.com:
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Literary Tattoos at POPSUGAR.com:
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I hope you enjoy these creative nods to literature as much as I did!

A Paper Craft Castle On the Ocean

Unfortunately this exhibition is several years old. BUT, the pictures here are worth seeing of this phenomenal work of art. Please click on “View Original” and enjoy this stunning piece!

Tokyobling's Blog

I had the wonderful opportunity to see this wonderful paper craft art installation by a genius of the name of Wataru Itou (伊藤航), a young student of a major art university here in Tokyo. The installation is hand made over four years of hard work, complete with electrical lights and a moving train, all made of paper! Clearly, this man must have created one of the most stunning examples of Paper Craft in the world? At the exhibition you will also have the chance to see a video showing Mr. Itou at work in his studio, cutting and folding piece by piece. The exhibition is called Umi no Ue no Oshiro (A Castle On the Ocean ), 海の上のお城. It is exhibited at Umihotaru, a place which in itself is a major attraction: a service area in the middle of the ocean, right between Tokyo City and Chiba Prefecture. If you…

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More Amazing Book Art

This post is brief because I simply want to direct you to a TED video where Brian Dettmer shows his audience the wonders he creates from old books. For me, this art is fascinating. I love books, and to see them changed so completely from stacks of rectangular papers to these intricately detailed art objects is thrilling. I hope you enjoy this as much as I did.

The Creative Genius of Book Art

It’s been too long since I’ve done a post relating to Book Art. And to rectify that situation, I am posting links to some incredible feats of bookish artistry.

To start, Gretha Scholtz did a post in her blog on April 10, 2012 featuring some lovely book art creations, which can be seen here. Included in her post are many works by Su Blackwell and other book artists, and it’s well worth checking out.  Screen Shot 2015-02-02 at 9.30.29 AM

*image retrieved from http://www.sublackwell.co.uk/portfolio-book-cut-sculpture/

Next, one of my personal favorites, Book and Paper Art UK by Andrea Hudspith. You can find her work on Facebook and on Twitter @BookPaperArtUK. Here’s a sneak peek at some of her work:                                                                         Screen Shot 2015-02-01 at 4.18.43 PM   Screen Shot 2015-02-01 at 4.19.38 PM     Screen Shot 2015-02-01 at 4.21.22 PM

*images retrieved from https://www.facebook.com/pages/Book-and-Paper-Art-UK-Andrea-Hudspith/267825323381496

Au pli des pages is out of France, and has some really neat designs, all folded into the pages of books! Go to their website auplidespages.fr or visit them @Auplidespages for more. (and here’s another sneak peek):                                                      Screen Shot 2015-02-01 at 4.31.00 PM     Screen Shot 2015-02-01 at 4.31.41 PM

*images retrieved from http://www.auplidespages.fr

An artist who is new to me, is Thurle Wright. She her website is thurle.com, and she can also be found on Twitter @thurlew. Her website is a delightful gallery of images, her installations, and exhibitions. Check it out!                                          Screen Shot 2015-02-01 at 4.51.58 PM

*image retrieved from thurle.com – gallery.

Graphic Novels?

In my December 18, 2014 posting, Intriguing!, I got to thinking about graphic novels a bit. I realized that I don’t own any, and if I want to build a well-rounded collection, I should have some in it. The problem for me is, most graphic novels are dark, both literally and figuratively. The subject matter is often less than uplifting, and the images are frequently very graphic. Go figure. So I decided that I would make it my mission to find at least one graphic novel that I like: one with pleasing illustrations, and an uplifting or at least interesting story line. And guess what? I found some.

Shaun Tan’s book, The Arrival (2007) is stunning. The illustrations reminded me right away of Chris Van Allsburg’s style, and the creativity displayed as Tan marries the age-old tale of a newcomer in a foreign land with futuristic cityscapes and animals provided a new delight on every page. At 128 pages, it’s really more of an illustrated story (there are no words), than a graphic novel, but it’s still a worthy addition to anyone’s collection and will be enjoyed by adults and children alike. For more information, check it out on Amazon.com.
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Here, by Richard McGuire (2014), is also a really neat book. As I mentioned in December, it is the story of one little piece of land  told over many centuries, with glimpses into different years together on the same page. This is definitely a novel, at 304 pages, and also worth adding to your collection. For more information, check it out on Amazon.com.
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More Book Art!

Hello! It’s been a while since my last post, and I do apologize for keeping all of my loyal fans perched on the edge of their seats in eager anticipation for so long. Seriously, though. It’s been a busy few weeks, but I thought I would get back into the swing of things by doing a post on everyone’s favorite genre of visual art: Book Art. If you love the art of the folded page, here is a very handy guide from Instructables.com on how to produce such masterpieces.

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(image retrieved from http://twentytwowords.com/turning-old-books-into-art-by-folding-the-pages-into-words-5-pictures/)

Inspiration Green also has some neat ideas and pictures of book art on their Art From Old Books page. Here’s an example:

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Jonathan Callan of London – “The Defrauder” joseebienvenugallery.com (image retrieved from http://www.inspirationgreen.com/art-from-old-books.html)

And last, but not least, is FlavorWire‘s post, “10 Visual Artists Who Use Books as Their Medium.” It’s got some really neat photos of work by Thomas Allen, Su Blackwell, Jeremy May, Mike Stilkey, and others. Check it out! Screen Shot 2014-10-21 at 4.59.30 PM

“The Message” by Robert The  (image retrieved from http://flavorwire.files.wordpress.com/2010/12/the_message.jpg)

Fiction Titles – A Shoutout to the 1990s (approximately)

Landscape of Lies by Peter Watson

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  • This is a page-turning thriller based on an enigmatic message from a medieval painting. Set in 1989, it’s also a entertaining trip down memory lane. Check out more reviews on Amazon.com, but beware, this link is to a new edition from 2005, so I don’t know how much editing has occurred in it.

The Eight by Katherine Neville

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  • The Eight is truly epic, spanning centuries and the entire globe. Also set around 1990, this book is a page-turner thriller. Check out more reviews on Amazon.com.

An Instance of the Fingerpost by Iain Pears

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  • I read this book in my early twenties and found it a very intense read, but I was proud of myself when I finished it.  Another work that falls firmly into the ‘epic’ category, it is a fascinating account of seventeenth-century science and a riveting mystery with a very unexpected ending. Highly recommended! Check out more reviews on Amazon.com.