More Book Headlines: Graphic History, YA Controversy, and 15 Signs of Book Addiction.

It’s as if they were reading my blog yesterday! (I wish..) The Independent reports on a new history of U.S. civil rights, as told in the style of a graphic novel. Read all about it and its 1950s comic book inspiration in A graphic history of US civil rights – in comic book form.

The Ottawa Citizen is reporting on the backlash received by a Governor General Literary Award-winning book for young adults. Read, Critics of ‘vulgar’ book for young adults want Governor General’s award rescinded to find out why there’s a petition to the Canada Council to have the 2014 award rescinded.

Lastly, you may be addicted to books. That’s not a bad thing, though! The Guardian shares 15 tell-tale signs to watch for if you’re still not sure this is you: 15 signs to prove you’re a book addict

Graphic Novels?

In my December 18, 2014 posting, Intriguing!, I got to thinking about graphic novels a bit. I realized that I don’t own any, and if I want to build a well-rounded collection, I should have some in it. The problem for me is, most graphic novels are dark, both literally and figuratively. The subject matter is often less than uplifting, and the images are frequently very graphic. Go figure. So I decided that I would make it my mission to find at least one graphic novel that I like: one with pleasing illustrations, and an uplifting or at least interesting story line. And guess what? I found some.

Shaun Tan’s book, The Arrival (2007) is stunning. The illustrations reminded me right away of Chris Van Allsburg’s style, and the creativity displayed as Tan marries the age-old tale of a newcomer in a foreign land with futuristic cityscapes and animals provided a new delight on every page. At 128 pages, it’s really more of an illustrated story (there are no words), than a graphic novel, but it’s still a worthy addition to anyone’s collection and will be enjoyed by adults and children alike. For more information, check it out on Amazon.com.
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Here, by Richard McGuire (2014), is also a really neat book. As I mentioned in December, it is the story of one little piece of land  told over many centuries, with glimpses into different years together on the same page. This is definitely a novel, at 304 pages, and also worth adding to your collection. For more information, check it out on Amazon.com.
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