Trees, Demons, and Secrets

There’s nothing like weeks of self-isolation to really help you get a a handle on your To Be Read pile. In keeping with one of this blog’s themes, suggesting books that are a little out of the ordinary, I would like to recommend a few titles. I haven’t done this in quite a while, so I would love to hear your thoughts and opinions on any of these titles, if you’ve read them. Or if you do read them. But full disclosure: the last one is pretty mainstream, so not exactly along the lines of ‘quirky’ or ‘out of the ordinary.’ Still a good book, though!

  1. The Overstory by Richard Powers

This book was incredibly moving, and extremely relevant to today’s world. A truly real glimpse into the impact that the natural world has on us, whether we are aware of it or not. The first section appears to be short stories, but parts two and three weave all the initial and seemingly unrelated stories together, creating an epic story that spans generations. Although this was not what I would call an ‘uplifting’ read, it was an excellent book, and I highly recommend it.

2. Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman

Wow, what a change of pace! This book is still in print, even though it was first published in 1996. So that should let you know right there, that this book is worth reading. Neverwhere falls into the fantasy category, but it’s not high fantasy, so there are still humans with pronounceable names, and they live on earth. Definitely a great escape from the ordinary, and it even causes a few chuckles along the way! If you are looking for something different to read that will quickly become hard to put down, look no further. Neverwhere is the answer.

3. Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng

As I mentioned at the beginning of this post, this is mainstream book. But, even books we find at the grocery store or in an airport departure lounge can still be good, and this was one of those books. It was a thought-provoking and intricate story, and also easy to read. A mysterious past, the fight over a baby’s future, and problems that everyone struggles with as they navigate the choppy waters of adolescence. This is a good story that will definitely help you escape the four walls of your home as you practice social distancing.

Please let me know if you read (or have read) these books. Other suggestions are always welcome, too! Stay healthy, xoxo

You gotta read this!

Hi everyone! I am so sorry I have been such an infrequent blogger this year. Interesting, original blog posts have been hard to come up with, and life has been so busy that I haven’t had many opportunities to read. But I hope I will be able to create more posts as we move into the second half of 2016.

This year, my goals is to re-read some of my favourite books, as well as to read some of the classics that I still haven’t read yet. Future posts will bring you up to date on my progress in those areas, but this post is about some new, interesting, and entertaining books I’ve read lately that I highly recommend.

  • The Case of the Secretive Sister by Nilanjan P. Choudhury

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I first heard of this absolutely delightful book from another blogger, The Bibulous Bibliobiuli. His review here is definitely worth reading to get more of a sense of this witty, engaging read. It’s published in India, and I have not read much contemporary Indian fiction, but this was a quick read that was fun from cover to cover. Perfect summer reading, or just to get away from everything for a while, I know you’ll be glad you read it.

  • Girl Waits With Gun by Amy Stewart

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This is the second book I’ve read by Amy Stewart, and I thoroughly enjoyed them both. Girl Waits With Gun takes place in pre-WWI America, and is based on true events. The author brings the past vividly to life in this story about a thug and his gang of hoodlums who hit a horse-drawn buggy while they are driving in their car. The three Kopp sisters were in the buggy at the time of the accident, and the story unfolds as they try to get the driver to pay up for the damages. A very satisfying story with a dose of history as well!

  • The Great Pearl Heist by Molly Caldwell Crosby

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The Great Pearl Heist falls into the true crime category. It’s a well-researched tale of the amazing theft of the world’s most expensive necklace. It happened in London in 1913, and as well as full details on the theft itself, we also learn a lot about policing and the art of detection at that time. For a synopsis, click here – but I have to warn you, if you don’t already, you will want to read the book after you learn more about it!