The Creative Genius of Book Art

It’s been too long since I’ve done a post relating to Book Art. And to rectify that situation, I am posting links to some incredible feats of bookish artistry.

To start, Gretha Scholtz did a post in her blog on April 10, 2012 featuring some lovely book art creations, which can be seen here. Included in her post are many works by Su Blackwell and other book artists, and it’s well worth checking out.  Screen Shot 2015-02-02 at 9.30.29 AM

*image retrieved from http://www.sublackwell.co.uk/portfolio-book-cut-sculpture/

Next, one of my personal favorites, Book and Paper Art UK by Andrea Hudspith. You can find her work on Facebook and on Twitter @BookPaperArtUK. Here’s a sneak peek at some of her work:                                                                         Screen Shot 2015-02-01 at 4.18.43 PM   Screen Shot 2015-02-01 at 4.19.38 PM     Screen Shot 2015-02-01 at 4.21.22 PM

*images retrieved from https://www.facebook.com/pages/Book-and-Paper-Art-UK-Andrea-Hudspith/267825323381496

Au pli des pages is out of France, and has some really neat designs, all folded into the pages of books! Go to their website auplidespages.fr or visit them @Auplidespages for more. (and here’s another sneak peek):                                                      Screen Shot 2015-02-01 at 4.31.00 PM     Screen Shot 2015-02-01 at 4.31.41 PM

*images retrieved from http://www.auplidespages.fr

An artist who is new to me, is Thurle Wright. She her website is thurle.com, and she can also be found on Twitter @thurlew. Her website is a delightful gallery of images, her installations, and exhibitions. Check it out!                                          Screen Shot 2015-02-01 at 4.51.58 PM

*image retrieved from thurle.com – gallery.

Great Detective Fiction

As winter approaches, time spent indoors with a good book and a cup of something hot becomes more and more appealing. Something to aim for at the end of the day, even. But maybe you don’t know what to read. Perhaps you’ve read all the books from your Amazon wish list and those hours on the couch under a blanket are making you anxious because you don’t have any books waiting (unlikely for a book lover, I know).

Well, be anxious no more! I have just the thing for a chilly winter’s eve: great detective novels from the early 20th century. Do you enjoy Agatha Christie? Then you will surely like the works by these award-winning mystery writers.

John Dickson Carr – Master of the “locked room mystery” where the detective solves an impossible-seeming crime, his books are easy and delightful to read. Dr. Fell is the main detective in the books he wrote under this name, although there are a few other titles with a different detective figure. Carr is perhaps best known for The Hollow Man, published in 1935 (US title- The Three Coffins).  Carter Dickson was a pseudonym, and books under this name have Sir Henry Merrivale as the detective. Carr was prolific, and his work The Crooked Hinge (1938) is often cited as a classic of great detective fiction.

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Ngaio Marsh – More murder, mystery and detection from the 1930s make these books a fun way to spend an evening. Marsh’s first novel was published in 1934, and Death in a White Tie (1938) is one of my favorites. She wrote eight books in the 1930s, but went on writing until the early 1980s. The main detective figure in Marsh’s mysteries is British CID detective Roderick Alleyn.

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Dorothy L. Sayers – As with the others listed in this post, books by Dorothy Sayers are pure entertainment, with interesting historical aspects for the history-lover as well. Whose Body? was one of her most popular, released in 1923, although the bulk of her mysteries were written in the ’30s.  (Five Red Herrings- 1931, Have His Carcase- 1932, The Nine Tailors- 1934 and several others). Lord Peter Wimsey is her main detective figure; she and Ngaio Marsh were both “Queens of Crime” along with Agatha Christie.

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High School Books

In high school English class, we all had various books assigned to us. In grade 9 I read The Chrysalids and Lord of the Flies, both of which I thoroughly unenjoyed.

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In grade 10 it was To Kill a Mockingbird, and I honestly don’t remember any books from grades 11 or 12. My last year went out with a bang, featuring a spectacularly depressing book by a Canadian author, The Stone Angel. (Yes, that was back when there were 5 years of high school here. But that’s for another post. Or even another blog.)

So now I ask you, dear readers, what did you read in high school English (aside from Shakespeare)? Please share! A synopsis and your opinions would be lovely, but I don’t ask you to invest a lot of time. Just some titles and comments. I’m looking forward to comparing our experiences!